Syrian refugees are fleeing the same unspeakable violence that has now unsettled the rest of the world. The daily bloodshed plaguing Syria is forcing families to leave their homes & their country behind. They are just some of the many.

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We are facing a lost generation

There are more than 65 million refugees in the world today – people forced to flee their homes due to conflict or persecution. This equates to one out of every 113 people in the world.

The war in Syria is in its sixth terrible year. Children are among the main casualties of this humanitarian crisis, making up 5.6 million — half — of Syrians in need of aid. The Mosul Offensive has displaced 3.3 million people within Iraq. Since December 2013, more than 1.66 million people have fled their homes in South Sudan – 640,000 living as refugees in neighboring countries. Displaced and refugee children are disproportionately vulnerable to malnutrition, illness, and exploitation.

The United States can make a difference in this crisis by robustly funding humanitarian accounts supporting refugees. In the President’s proposed budget for FY 18, one critical account to help refugees forced to flee has been completely eliminated.

Contact your representatives and tell them that as an American you want the United States to continue our history of aiding and caring for the oppressed and vulnerable.

Ask your members of Congress to increase funding for these accounts as they negotiate the budget and to prioritize funding for children, child protection, and education. This will not fix everything or make up current deficits - which are substantial - but it will help by providing much-needed aid. Your voice will remind members of Congress that Americans care about this issue – these people, and give them the encouragement they need to take action.

“For I was hungry and you gave me something to eat, I was thirsty and you gave me something to drink, I was a stranger and you invited me in.” — Matthew 25:35, NIV

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